Episodes

Happy Juneteenth Jubilee Cousins!

If like us you’re putting off trips for a while we hope you come along with us while we pretend we’re on the continent for Juneteenth Jubilee Holiday Celebrations. Be sure to check out Our Essential Juneteenth List of Film, TV, and Books recommendations curated in part by Young East African Girl Podcast Guests. Please make sure you comment, rate and subscribe. Send us your feedback at contact@youngeastafricangirl.com

Accra Trip Sources:

  1. Sobolo Spiced Hibiscus Drink 
  2. Hit up Gallery 1957 
  3. Make time for Makola market
  4. Cook up some Wakaye 
  5. Soak up the music at true Ghanian Hot Spot 
  6. Check out Daily Paper – A Collaboration Between Global Diasporic Visionaries 
  7. Yes we said Ghollywood: Stream Potomanto  and Shampaign on Demand Africa.
  8. Head over to Afrochella
  9. http://republicbargh.com/
  10. The Apagya Showband - Nsamanfo Baby-Baby
 

 

 

In this week's episode, we are joined by award-winning writer, director, and producer Idil Ibrahim. We talk about her intrepid upbringing, the importance of exploration, and why you need to have a sense of abandon. We also discuss our favourite childhood films, Idil's move to New York City, and why following her intuition led Idil to create a practice of combining human rights, social issues, and independent films. Finally, we discuss beautiful alignments on the continent, the ethics of shooting on the continent, and Black space as the grand homecoming. 

Please make sure you comment, rate and subscribe. Send us your feedback at contact@youngeastafricangirl.com

Recommendations from this episode:

The Vanishing Half 

Barry Jenkins The Underground Railroad

From a Crooked Rib 

 

 

In this week's episode, we are joined by our resident news correspondent and gossip girl May. We investigate the appeal of Candace Owens, the curious case of William Amos’ Zoom exhibitionism, the latest on our favourite Royals, the ever-evolving story of Jen and Ben and the name Karen is on the decline.

Please make sure you comment, rate and subscribe. Send us your feedback at contact@youngeastafricangirl.com

This week we’re joined by Charlotte Makala an artist, poet, actress, and writer based in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Charlotte shares her experience growing up in Oman, auditioning for her first acting role in Malaysia, L.A. heartbreak and relocating to Tanzania during the pandemic. Charlotte was kind enough to read some of her poetry for us, you can find her book The Colour of Promise on Amazon. 

We’re joined this week by Hanna Rutha, activist and host of The Uprooted podcast. Hanna Rutha shares her family’s migration story, growing up in the Bay Area, what’s currently happening in Tigray, the roots of her activism work, how to stand up for Black Lives globally, self-care tools for grassroots organizing and teaches us about the power of saying no.

If you would like to learn more about the genocide in Tigray, here are some resources:

I Stand With Tigray

Omna Tigray

National Protest Against 200 days of #Tigraygenocide

This week we discuss Joe Rogan vs lockdowns, celebrating yet another Eid during the pandemic, we get into the Verzuz battle we did not ask for Umar Johnson vs Kevin Samuels, Ebony K. Williams on the Real Housewives of New York, Ziwe’s new show, Drake’s Mother’s Day candle offerings and Joseline Hernandez.

May 12 tune in for new content on Season 2 of the Young East African Girl Podcast with Kaha and Muna. That means more interviews, more lukewarm topics, and more stories that move us to tears and laughter, you guys. Not to mention exclusive bonus episodes on the pain and joy of trying to evolve during this human experience. Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. 

 

This week on a Young East African Girl extrasode we discuss our feelings about the untimely passing of Rapper-Actor DMX, the Chauvin Trial, Daunte Wright, love during Ramadan, vaccine eligibility, and share some good news from the internet.

We are as hard at work as Africa, and we can't wait to share more episodes with you cousins!  

Good News from The Internet:

Lupita Nyong'o On Holiday in Lamu

La'Ron Hines

Tour Naomi Campbell's Sprawling Kenyan Escape

Digital Iftars

Dave Chappelle on Stand-Up, Africa, and Dancing in the White House

References: 

One Caribbean St Vincent And The Grenadines

Dr. Laura McNeal

COVID Vaccines in Ontario

 

 

This week we're joined by Aisha Yusuf author of Race To The Finish Line and founder of Abayo House. She is an author, editor, and publisher who is passionate about the diversification of literature and aims to create stories that bring underrepresented voices to the forefront. You can find her work at www.aishayusuf.com.

Recommendations from this episode:

TV Shows:

All American

Books:

The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Professional Troublemaker by Luvvie Ajayi Jones

We Hunt the Flame Hafsah Faizal

 

 

 

 

Antonio Michael Downing joins us to discuss his best-selling memoir Saga Boy: My Life of Blackness and Becoming. He is a musician, writer, and activist based in Toronto and composes music as John Orpheus

 

Recommendations from this episode:

Books:

Can You Hear Me Now? by Celina Caesar-Chavannes

BLACK FUTURES ANTHOLOGY

Frying Plantain by Zalika Reid-Benta

Music:

Lianne La Havas

Gary Clarke Jr

 

In this week's episode of Young East African Girl, we talk to London-based Idole. She is a Certified Performance Coach, host of Outspoken Truths on GN Radio UK, Certified Pranic healer, content creator, and founder of the Rwanda Hub on Clubhouse. We cover her family's migration story, spiritual baths, Rwanda Hub Playlist and all the things we're reading, watching, and listening to in the Black Diaspora.

Official 🇷🇼 RWANDA Hub ‘Playlist’

Recommendations from this episode:

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

The Vanishing Half by Britt Bennett

Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

Saga Boy by Antonio Michael Downing

John Drabinski, 'Glissant and the Middle Passage'

African Holistic Health by Dr.Llaila O.Afrika

“If we give our children sound self-love. they will be able to deal with whatever life puts before them”. - bell hooks.

Once upon a time, a Prince and a Duchess stepped away from the monarchy due to intense public pressure. Coming to America in the spring of 2020, they relocated to Montecito, a seaside Santa Barbara County enclave. It's there that they sat down for a special prime time interview with their neighbour Oprah. This interview would challenge the mythology of the British Royal Family and cause waves across the Commonwealth and the world. We sat through all the commercials (there were so many) so we could cover it for you cousins. Thankfully we were joined by May, our resident royal expert.

 
 
 

The great Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe explains “a story does many things. It entertains, it informs, it instructs”.

We in the diaspora can indeed learn a lot about each other from our stories. This week we chat with Hope Hajir, a Kenyan/Sudanese content creator, rising star, host of The Afroverse Podcast and a scholar educated in Kenya, South Africa and now studying in Indiana. Next, taking over the world as Kenyan president? #HopeHajir2027

We swapped stories and like all stories between us, it was a communal participatory experience. We were trying to understand our different experiences and bonded over our shared experiences. She tells us about how she began doing comedy as a way to explore feeling othered and how in doing so, she has centred many of us. As we chat we’ll find our ways through pleasure activism, African love languages, soul wins, bonding with other intellectual prostitutes, the pursuit of genius-level talent and in praise of detaching oneself from the impact of their work! We hope you enjoy our conversation as much as we did!

Hope Hajir's Playlist

Happy Black History Month cousins! This is our third episode in a three-part Canadian Black History Month series. We discuss our miseducation on Canadian Black History, summer 2020 AKA the summer of racial reckoning AKA the summer of our procrastination, and share the final instalment of the captivating love story of Black Canadian refugees Lucie and Thornton Blackburn. 

References:

Black history in Canada: a live, interactive roundtable

https://profiles.laps.yorku.ca/profiles/aadavis/

I've Got a Home in Glory Land: A Lost Tale of the Underground

Happy Black History Month cousins! This is our second episode in a three-part Canadian Black History Month series. Welcome back as we continue to discuss our miseducation on Canadian Black History, summer 2020 AKA the summer of racial reckoning AKA the summer of our procrastination, and share more on the Detroit portion of the captivating story of Black Canadian refugees Lucie and Thornton Blackburn.

 

 

Reference:

I've Got a Home in Glory Land: A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad

Happy Black History Month cousins! This is our first episode in a three-part BHM series. We discuss our miseducation on Canadian Black History, summer 2020 AKA the summer of racial reckoning, AKA the summer of our procrastination, and share the captivating love story of Black Canadian refugees Lucie and Thornton Blackburn.

 

Reference:

I've Got a Home in Glory Land: A Lost Tale of the Underground Railroad

This week we are joined by Shad, artist and host of Hip-Hop Evolution on Netflix. 

We discuss the Somali-Rwanda connection, his family's migration story, creative routines during the pandemic, growing up Black in Canada with African Parents, the art of interviewing, and Verzuz Battles 

On this week's episode of the Young East African Girl podcast, we are joined by Los Angeles–based filmmaker and writer Khalid Moalim. Khalid is currently a script coordinator on the hit CBS show NCIS: New Orleans. We talk about the state of the world, his spiritual practice, and how he found his way into writing. We discuss his education at The Ohio State University and his entry point into writing through journalism as both a sports reporter and NPR intern, and his eventual shift into film and TV. 

Join us as we demystify work in the film industry and learn how Khalid found his way onto the set of Boots Riley's award-winning film Sorry to Bother You, and what important lessons he learned from working with Neal Brennan co-creator of the Chapelle Show and much much more!

Warsan Shire

North of Dawn by Nuruddin Farah

On this week’s episode of Young East African Girl, we are joined by entrepreneur, educator, and actor Lina Mohammed.

We discuss Lina’s Ethiopian roots, growing up in Dallas, Texas, the challenges of trying to making it in LA and thriving in the Big Apple. Lina shares how she started her business Lina and Co., her thoughts on Black Muslim identity, anti-Blackness in the Muslim community and enlightens us with a brilliant travel hack.

Please make sure you comment, rate and subscribe. Send us your feedback at contact@youngeastafricangirl.com.

On this week's episode, we are joined by our resident news correspondent and gossip girl May. We cover the latest stories of oppression FOMO in our post-Rachel Dolezal world, Hilaria Baldwin (celebrity influencer-grifter), Jessica "La Bombalera" Krug (academic-grifter), and Michelle Latimer (filmmaker-grifter) *allegedly*. We'll make some unexpected pit spots along the way and give our predictions on whether racial grifting is truly on the rise. 

Please make sure you comment, rate and subscribe. Send us your feedback at contact@youngeastafricangirl.com.

 

 

 

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